Assignment 5

Great, compact and very informative lectures, and visual references enhanced the message. I know, I’ll be rewatching it over and over again. Here are a few examples that popped into my head as I was watching the videos. 

Three posters below, created decades apart, deliver different messages in a very similar way.  All three only use 3 colors, they are very graphic, with minimum typography that helps to reinforce the message. 

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In Angela Davis poster, however, in addition to constructivism, negative space was filled with patterns (Arts and Crafts movement) that is very similar to African pattern printed fabric.

Currently some the most recognizable protest posters follow the same design; reconstructing an image (often a photograph) by simplifying, so the message is clear, but the image is still identifiable.

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Sean Adams talks about how important it is to not overcrowd a design. The images below illustrate that; the message is the same, but the approach is different. 

 Black and white contrast makes it visually clear; font size emphasizes important points; the text fills the whole page and becomes “the image”

Black and white contrast makes it visually clear; font size emphasizes important points; the text fills the whole page and becomes “the image”

 Even though this design has so many element, it becomes monotone. nothing stands out, but everything distracts. white text on light background is a little hard to read and the words on the side of the building (due to font and direction) hard to identify.

Even though this design has so many element, it becomes monotone. nothing stands out, but everything distracts. white text on light background is a little hard to read and the words on the side of the building (due to font and direction) hard to identify.

Speaking of design as a tool to simplify a message. Honestly, I am not sure if it is relevant here, but while watching Adams, I thought of paper forms that require list of items and how lines alternate from white to gray to make it easier to follow.

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As a photographer, I use many of the composition principals that Sean Adams covers. I can talk so much about it here, but I will make one comment. I think it’s very important to differentiate symmetry from balance. Below are Steve McCurry work. Traditional composition rules and color use are very prominent in his work. 

 Symmetry

Symmetry

 Balance

Balance

Many years ago I was suggested to study Wassili Kandinsky’s paintings to understand balance. Shapes, lines, and colors fill the space in a particular way creating visual balance which is the goal.

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And as I was posting links on my tumbler page, I looked at the logo, which is perfect example of simplicity representing complexity. Colors, typography, and size come together and become so identifiable. It’s fascinating how one letter of a specific shape and color gives us so much information, or a certain shade of blue makes us thing of jewelry. It is also alarming, it is a form of manipulation. 

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